10 Fun Facts About Canada That Will Blow Your Mind

Settlement in the North Pole in CanadaPhoto: Shutterstock

Alert, Nunavut, is the world’s northernmost settlement

At the northern tip of Ellesmere Island, just 817 kilometres from the North Pole, you’ll find the northernmost permanently inhabited place in the world: Alert, Nunavut. It might not have malls or movie theatres but Alert is the temporary home to military and scientific personnel working in the area. The “temporary home” part will make sense once you realize how cold this place gets: the warmest month, July, has a balmy average temperature of 3.4 C (38.1 F). By January, the coldest month, the mean temperature has plunged to -32.19 C (-26 F). No wonder they named it Alert.

Check out more of the best Canadian attractions you’ve never heard of.

Lighthouse on Magdalen Islands in QuebecPhoto: Shutterstock

Canada has the world’s longest coastline

If you walked and never stopped—not to eat, not to rest your feet, not to get some sleep—it would take you four-and-a-half years to walk the length of Canada’s coastline. While our country might not conjure up images of blue waters and white sandy beaches, Canada has the world’s longest coastline, bordered on three sides by three different oceans: the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific. To put that fascinating fact about Canada in perspective, that accounts for 202,080 of the world’s total 356,000 kilometres of oceanfront property. The only other country that even comes close is Indonesia, which has 54,716 km of coastline. Ready to explore that vast shoreline? These 10 essential east coast experiences are a great place to start.

Forests in CanadaPhoto: Shutterstock

Canada has 10 per cent of the world’s forests

One of the most widely-known facts about Canada is that we’ve got an abundance of trees, but did you know that Canada actually boasts 30 per cent of the world’s boreal forest and 10 per cent of the world’s total forest cover? An incredible 396.9-million hectares of forest and other wooded land can be found across the country, and 68 per cent of that is coniferous. The best part of all? Most of our forest land is publicly owned, and much of of it can be explored in these 50 gorgeous parks across Canada.

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